Category Archives: Usability

Sony a6000 Thinks It’s 12/31/69!

I just solved a terrifying and frustrating issue with family photos taken on our Sony a6000. I found no solutions online, so I’m posting the issue as well as my solution to spare others the same headache.

As I was looking at photos on our Apple Mac Mini computer tonight, I noticed that all of them had a Created date of 12/31/69 7:00 PM. What?! Was this OS X’s fault or the a6000’s? I did some googling to no avail. I only saw mentions of leap year bugs in other hardware and software products.

On a whim, I turned on our a6000 to see if it still had copies of the photos. It didn’t, but it still had an image index of all the photos going back to when we first purchased the camera, properly dated. However, each thumbnail displayed with a “?” question mark and “Unable to display” when trying to view on the camera. I had previously moved all the photo files to our computer while the camera was connected with its USB cable, which is why they weren’t on the camera anymore. As I started deleting really old photo thumbnails off the camera using the camera controls, I started getting messages like “Recovering Data,” “Writing to the memory card was not completed correctly,” and the camera would occasionally reboot in utter confusion with no real way of escape. I had stumbled upon a real mess.

This mess got me thinking, “maybe the Sony a6000 software engineers didn’t do a good job engineering for the case where photo files were moved from the camera to a computer via USB Mode and OS X Finder.” I haven’t ever run into an issue like this one with other devices, but maybe I needed another way to copy the files to our computer to extract the right creation date.

As an experiment, I copied the files for the photos from our Mac Mini back over to our a6000 via the file system–essentially putting them back where they came from. The photo index then had a few real thumbnails–the photos that didn’t have thumbnails were ones I had deleted on the computer months ago. From there I started OS X’s Preview app. I clicked File > Import > NO NAME. “NO NAME” is the volume name for the Sony a6000 memory card when connected in USB Mode. From there I imported the files to the Mac, and, voilà, the creation date was now correct.

The best guess I have is that the Sony a6000 is using 12/31/1969 (or some null value) as the file system created dates on its memory card. I’m also guessing that the OS X Preview app is extracting the created dates not from the memory card file system but from the photos’ meta data. Then I suspect it is using those values to set the created dates on the Mac’s hard drive when importing the photo files.

After successfully importing all the files from the a6000, I used the camera’s format feature to wipe the memory card clean. From now on, I will be using Preview, Photos, or some other OS X photo app to import our photo files, not dragging and dropping them from the NO NAME volume to our computer directly.

I hope this helps someone else someday. Drop me a note if it does.

 

Note: if you are trying to recover from the same issue, but you have already wiped your memory card or deleted the thumbnails for the files you are trying to recover, I do not know how to resolve your issue. I’m sorry!

Google Analytics Crash Course Notes

Thinking that you will adequately learn Google Analytics by clicking around the product, even over years, is a foolish concept. You will only understand a subset of its features and how they work together. You need to do your homework.

I cannot improve upon Google Analytics’ (GA) own crash course, titled Google Analytics IQ Lessons. It covers just about all the material in the paid Analytics courses (101, 201, and 301) at just the right level–not too high, and not too deep.

Here are my notes of the key gotcha’s and items to configure for your GA Web Properties. As well, I’ve linked to other helpful learning resources. As is my standard practice, this is mostly for my reference down-the-road, so it’s not comprehensive. However, I figure others can benefit from them as well.

Gotcha’s

  • Incognito mode and other browser privacy sessions count as new Visitors, Visits, and Page Views, as if the user had cleared his cookies. Not a huge surprise to most, I’m sure. (Although other trackers can still track you.)
  • Visits are separated by exits from the site or a 30-minute cookie timeout while on the site. Advertising Campaign attribution expires after a 6-month cookie timeout. Both are customizable.
  • Time on Exit Pages is not tracked because time is calculated between page loads on the same site. This also means that Bounce Page time is not tracked either. This has serious implications for some genres of sites, like blogs where a bit of traffic goes into and out of a single article. Know how to track Exit Page times and Bounce Pages, if you need to.
  • A Visitor can only trigger a Goal conversion once during a Visit, but can trigger an E-commerce Goal multiple times in a Visit.
  • Filters are applied between raw data capture and the Account’s Profile where the data is ultimately stored. Even if you change a Filter that sits in-between the raw feed and Profile, you cannot recover historical data. Try accomplishing the same filtering with Advanced Segments instead, which don’t run the risk of losing data. At the least, you should use Advanced Segments or other features to test concepts before creating a real Filter for them.
  • Domains and subdomains can break tracking in many glorious ways–especially E-commerce Goal tracking.

Basic Checklist

  • Always have a raw Profile that has no Filters, Advanced Segments, etc.
  • Have a Profile that excludes internal IP address so you’re not tracking yourself and your staff as they click around your site.
  • Have a Profile that exclusively tracks internal IP addresses for debugging Google Analytics code on your site.
  • Use the Google Analytics Debugger Chrome Extension for your own debugging and analysis of competitors’ tracking.
  • Enable Auto-Tagging between Google AdWords and Analytics if you are using both products.
  • If you create an AdWords Profile, set up two Filters to focus-in on AdWords traffic (Campaign Source: google, Campaign Medium: cpc).
  • Set up E-commerce tracking.
  • Set up Goal tracking.
  • Set up Internal Site Search tracking. (It’s much easier than you think.)
  • Utilize _addIgnoredOrganic to attribute Organic Search Visits for your web site’s address (i.e. someone searching for “example.com”) to a Direct Visit instead.
  • Set up appropriate Custom Variables to track additional information about Visitors, Visits, and Page Views.

Hopefully, all these will help us do a better job optimizing our customer average lifetime value (LTV).