Specificity, Eames. Specificity?!

Way-back-when, I suggested that CSS authors use classes as much as possible. It was a foggy idea at the time, but, thankfully, someone important stumbled-upon the same concept, and codified it. Around the same time, it started to become popular for developers to consolidate CSS and JavaScript into two files for their sites. This technique saves HTTP requests, speeding-up users’ experiences of your site.

Now that I have had a few years to use these techniques, I’m happy to report they work beautifully; that is, until you have large CSS and JavaScript files that take a long time to download. Long downloads risk new visitors’ first impressions. You want it them to be wowed. A slow introduction doesn’t wow.

Large CSS and JavaScript files are often symptomatic of defining a heterogeneous set of styles or behaviors for very particular elements on very particular pages. In other words, styles and behaviors that aren’t re-used; ones that don’t scale. Here are some straightforward techniques to lighten those two global files:

  1. Page-specific styles. I see CSS as a way to define general styles that affect large portions of a site (using classes). If you want to do something really, really special on a particular page, just put it inside the handful of elements that want to be different as inline styles. (ID selectors are a dying breed.) There’s no need to define rules in a global style sheet if they’re not really global. If the page has a lot of inline styles, and they are making the markup unmanageable, you can always extract the styles into a page-specific stylesheet. One extra HTTP request on one page (or a handful of pages) won’t kill you or your users.
  2. Page-specific JavaScript. Users may never even get to some pages; why slow down their first request to your site to grab JavaScript for them? Don’t be ashamed to slap-in a JavaScript script block at the bottom of your page’s markup.
There is a continuum between two consolidated files for all your CSS and JavaScript and obtrusive CSS and JavaScript. As with many other things in life, you’ve gotta’ find the healthy balance.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s